What’s that Shape?

By age 6, children should be able to demonstrate an understanding of shapes through analysis, comparison, composition and creation. Shape Game 1.

Most preschool math curricula the world over prescribe two essential areas for kindergartners. The first is representing and relating whole numbers to objects. The second is describing shapes and space. (NGA Center & CCSSO 2010)*.

By age 6, children should be able to demonstrate an understanding of shapes through analysis, comparison, composition and creation*. Colours and shapes are tangible, recognisable attributes of the outside world and something children can immediately relate to. They provide the vital foundation for understanding concepts in mathematics and science later on.

In our Play School App, our first Shapes Game has 2 levels.

In Level 1, we introduce shapes to children through the story of Sammy the Starfish. In the presentation section of this game, Sammy the forgetful starfish, goes through the various shapes that he thinks he is. In the practice stage, children are asked to master the names and forms of the different shapes and are finally assessed in the gameplay stage.

In Level 2 of the same game, more complex shapes are introduced. Rectangles, trapezoids, the pentagon etc. Again, we bring back our favourite Octopus, Ollie, to present these shapes through song and story to students. Children practice learning these new shapes in a safe area, where they can learn at their own pace and are then asked to produce the shapes through gameplay!

Learning shapes lays the foundation for more complex mathematical learning. You can also use flashcards to play a follow-up game, Tic Tac Toe, which familiarises children with all the basic shapes.

Source: *http://www.naeyc.org/tyc/article/shapes_space